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Zephfire

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Apr 4 10 10:14 AM

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I saw in other threads that some of you are enjoying hunting out the Shakespeare quotes and references to other films & books, Raiders of the Lost Ark for example that Michael has slipped into the series, so here's a thread for you to be able to post them all and discuss them all in one place, happy hunting!
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Michael Scott

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Apr 4 10 8:23 PM

QUOTE (Zephfire @ April 04, 2010 10:14 am)
I saw in other threads that some of you are enjoying hunting out the Shakespeare quotes and references to other films & books, Raiders of the Lost Ark for example   that Michael has slipped into the series, so here's a thread for you to be able to post them all and discuss them all in one place, happy hunting!

I may even award Gold, Silver and Black auras if the research into the quotes is good enough. Remember, don't just say, "this quote is from Hamlet..." give us details.

There are some very obscure ones in the 4 books written thus far.

Michael

#2 [url]

Apr 5 10 12:44 PM

Awesome. Thank you Zephire and Mr. Scott.


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QUOTE ( The Alchemyst)
I've known Nicholas Flamel for a very long time. He is many things-Dangerous and devious, cunning and deadly, a good friend and an implacable enemy-but he comes from an age when a man's word was indeed precious. If he gives you his word that he's done all this for your protection, then I am suggesting that you believe him. ~ Scathach

Aura: Orange...... Scent: Fresh Linen/Cotton...... Element: Wind

#4 [url]

Jun 8 10 6:33 AM

flamelssecret/spoilerwarning-2.gif ??

From the Junkyard scene in the Sorceress P. 286 we find many amazing quotes glued together each worthy of their own disection:

“Boil and bubble, boil and bubble”
“First, let us have the serpent of the Nile. . . .”
“Snakes! Why are there always snakes?”
“. . . spotted snakes with double tongue . . . And now for some thorny hedgehogs, newts and blind worms . . .
“toads, ugly and venomous,”
“. . . and finally, screech owls . ..”
“Enough,”… “Enough?”… “Aye, ’tis done.”
“When shall we three meet again?”
“We only part to meet again”
A poem called “Black-Eyed Susan”. By an English Dramatist whose name triggers the auto censor.

Most of these I am at least aware of their origin, but a little further research into the “Serpent of the Nile” quote has led me to some interesting assessments. Now, I cannot say with full 100% confidence that I have even headed in the right direction for the origin of this quote, but I think that some of what I have uncovered is worth a look nonetheless. From Shakespeare’s play Antony and Cleopatra (Act 1 scene 5 lines 25-26 we find the line, “Where is my Serpent of Old Nile? For so he calls me now.” From both my Arden Shakespeares and Riverside Shakespeares as well as a few other spots I have found that Cleopatra is often compared to the goddess Isis, and Antony her Osiris. Each often representing the moon or “terrene” (earthly) moon and sun respectively, “Alack, our terrene moon is now eclips’d and it portends alone the fall of Antony (Act 3 Scene 13 lines 152-154).” Also there is this line I like, just because of this series, at the end of Antony and Cleopatra in which she requests the snake from the Clown, which reads, “I would not be the party that should desire to touch him, for his biting is immortal; those that do die of it do seldom or never recover (Act 5 scene 2 lines 245-58).” Just a few things I had fun finding, and thoughts I had.

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Calliope

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Jun 11 10 5:42 PM

QUOTE (Lucy @ June 08, 2010 04:33 pm)
flamelssecret/spoilerwarning-2.gif ??


“When shall we three meet again?” Macbeth, Act I, Scene i , l. 1; Thought I'd just put that there for you Lucy.



I actually find this line interesting. It is said by the first of the weïrd sisters. The reason I find it interesting is that in Macbeth, the weïrd sisters are associated with Hekate (the bard's spelling is "Hecate"). I thought the other few lines that Lucy put there were also references to Macbeth, but they seem to be just a bit too paraphrased, so I didn't go looking for them in that particular play. I actually have one question about the Shakespeare quotes: are they going to be from the plays and poems, or just the plays?

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Aura Colour: Jade 
Aura Scent: Black Tea and Chocolate

#6 [url]

Jun 12 10 3:00 AM

This is a link to several of the quotes, though we have answers to a few more. The speculation starts several posts up of what I am putting the link too, but it is fun to speculate, so perhaps you can add in some of your good thoughts to the list

http://flamelssecret.9.forumer.com/index.p...indpost&p=20022

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#7 [url]

Dec 28 10 10:41 PM

whats also kinda funny about the smell of the three witches from "the scottish" . Foul and hungered i believe they are refered to as. works with the scents of auras ... flamelssecret/twocents.gif

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#9 [url]

Jun 25 11 2:34 PM

When he sees the flying saucers, he tells Palamedes "I told you there were more things in---" and then he is cut off, but we can guess where it's going. Hamlet, act 1, scene 5.

Aura: Deep Red
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Magics: Fire and Air
The promise given was a necessity of the past, the word broken is a necessity of the present.

#10 [url]

Aug 20 11 4:03 PM

Is that "There are more things in heaven and earth than can be dreamt of in your philosophy, Horatio (Palamedes)"?


EDIT: I did not double post, there was another post here that is now missing.

THis was the post, from Papa Pat, can also be found in the Nameless City thread

QUOTE (Papa Pat @ August 10, 2011 10:03 pm)
Just a thought - Michael has affirmed that "The Nameless City" is the very same city as in the H.P. Lovecraft story of the same name. In that one, the narrator discovers a group of temples carved into the rock by an unknown long-gone race of beings. All of the altars and other furnishings indicated that this race had been quite small, and reptilian. The doors were smaller than the narrator thought "proper".

In The Necromancer (p. 185 of the USA version), the Library's doors were too TALL, and the handles too HIGH.

One similarity between Michael's description and that of H.P.L. is that of the stairsteps. "Too shallow", according to Prometheus. "Very small [but] numerous", says Lovecraft's protagonist. Which suggests something more like a ramp rather than stairs -- something that a creature with very short legs, or even snakelike, could negotiate better than "normal" stairs.

So are you thinking that it was a mistake on Michael's part?

To me though it would simply suggest something that had either very short legs or was very short (which doesn't really fit in with the description of the doors as too tall and the handles too high) because steps would seem like something that a reptile would find very difficult or awkward to traverse, there would be many, much easier designs that they could use, such as a ramp, as you said.


I've fixed the post for you, since two consecutive posts is still considered a double post. ~ Moviebuff

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Zephfire

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Posts: 18,045

#11 [url]

Apr 12 12 1:09 AM

**This thread has now closed to prevent spoilers from The Enchantress**

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